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Indication & Important Safety Information for Soliris® (eculizumab)

INDICATION

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH)
Soliris is indicated for the treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) to reduce hemolysis.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: SERIOUS MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris.
Meningococcal infection may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early.

  • Comply with the most current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for meningococcal vaccination in patients with complement deficiencies.
  • Immunize patients with meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks prior to administering the first dose of Soliris, unless the risks of delaying Soliris therapy outweigh the risk of developing a meningococcal infection. (See Serious Meningococcal Infections for additional guidance on the management of the risk of meningococcal infection)
  • Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections. Monitor patients for early signs of meningococcal infections and evaluate immediately if infection is suspected.

Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program. Enrollment in the Soliris REMS program and additional information are available by telephone: 1-888-SOLIRIS (1-888-765-4747) or at www.solirisrems.com.

Contraindications

Soliris is contraindicated in:

  • Patients with unresolved serious Neisseria meningitidis infection
  • Patients who are not currently vaccinated against Neisseria meningitidis, unless the risks of delaying Soliris treatment outweigh the risks of developing a meningococcal infection

Warnings and Precautions

Serious Meningococcal Infections

Risk and Prevention

See Boxed WARNING for additional information on serious meningococcal infections.

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris. The use of Soliris increases a patient’s susceptibility to serious meningococcal infections (septicemia and/or meningitis).

Vaccinate for meningococcal disease according to the most current ACIP recommendations for patients with complement deficiencies. Revaccinate patients in accordance with ACIP recommendations, considering the duration of Soliris therapy.

Immunize patients without a history of meningococcal vaccination at least 2 weeks prior to receiving the first dose of Soliris. If urgent Soliris therapy is indicated in an unvaccinated patient, administer meningococcal vaccine(s) as soon as possible and provide patients with two weeks of antibacterial drug prophylaxis.

The benefits and risks of antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of meningococcal infections in patients receiving Soliris have not been established.
Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections.

Closely monitor patients for early signs and symptoms of meningococcal infection and evaluate patients immediately if an infection is suspected. Meningococcal infection may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early. Discontinue Soliris in patients who are undergoing treatment for serious meningococcal infections.

REMS
Because of the risk of meningococcal infections, Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a REMS. Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program.

Prescribers must counsel patients about the risk of meningococcal infection, provide the patients with the REMS educational materials, and ensure patients are vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine(s).

Other Infections
Serious infections with Neisseria species (other than N. meningitidis), including disseminated gonococcal infections, have been reported.

Soliris blocks terminal complement activation; therefore patients may have increased susceptibility to infections, especially with encapsulated bacteria. Additionally, Aspergillus infections have occurred in immunocompromised and neutropenic patients. Children treated with Soliris may be at increased risk of developing serious infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Administer vaccinations for the prevention of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections according to ACIP guidelines. Use caution when administering Soliris to patients with any systemic infection.

Monitoring Disease Manifestations After Soliris Discontinuation

Treatment Discontinuation for PNH
Monitor patients after discontinuing Soliris for at least 8 weeks to detect hemolysis.

Thrombosis Prevention and Management
The effect of withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy during Soliris treatment has not been established. Therefore, treatment with Soliris should not alter anticoagulant management.

Infusion Reactions
Administration of Soliris may result in infusion reactions, including anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. In clinical trials, no patients experienced an infusion reaction which required discontinuation of Soliris. Interrupt Soliris infusion and institute appropriate supportive measures if signs of cardiovascular instability or respiratory compromise occur.

Adverse Reactions
The most frequently reported adverse reactions in the PNH randomized trial (≥10% overall and greater than placebo) are: headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, and nausea.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Soliris, including boxed WARNING regarding serious meningococcal infections.

Treatment Expectations

Seeing results with Soliris®

Factors to consider in evaluating Soliris therapeutic response

Monitor LDH to assess your PNH patient’s response to Soliris5

Labs Considerations for use in monitoring of PNH Accurate measurement of patient response?

LDH

  • Key marker for tracking reduction over time in intravascular hemolysis caused by PNH2,7,8

    • Establish baseline and continue monitoring over time due to the chronic and progressive nature of PNH9,10

  • Used to monitor response to Soliris1,11

    • Can help determine optimal treatment intervals12

Yes


Hemoglobin/Anemia
  • In PNH, the absence of anemia does not alleviate the risk of hemolysis and thrombotic events (TEs)13,14

  • Increases in hemoglobin during treatment do not indicate protection against hemolysis10,14,15

No


Platelet counts
  • May be unchanged after months of treatment despite significantly reduced LDH levels and transfusion needs16

  • Not a data point assessed in PNH clinical trials

No


Transfusion requirements
  • May still be required in patients with bone marrow dysfunction, since Soliris only addresses hemolysis and not RBC production issues12,6,7

  • Reductions during treatment do not indicate protection against hemolysis1,4,15

No

  • Other useful measures for monitoring patient response include fatigue and health-related quality of life1

Soliris is indicated for treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) to reduce hemolysis.

Adverse Reactions

The most frequently reported adverse reactions in the PNH randomized trial (≥10% overall and greater than placebo) are: headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, and nausea.

Please see additional Important Safety Information for Soliris, including Boxed WARNING regarding serious meningococcal infections, below.

Personalized Patient Support

Alexion Nurse Case Managers are here to help you and your patients

A patient brochure that provides information on PNH and treatment with Soliris.

Important Safety Information

Indication & Important Safety Information for Soliris® (eculizumab)

INDICATION

Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH)
Soliris is indicated for the treatment of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) to reduce hemolysis.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: SERIOUS MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTIONS

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris.
Meningococcal infection may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early.

  • Comply with the most current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for meningococcal vaccination in patients with complement deficiencies.
  • Immunize patients with meningococcal vaccines at least 2 weeks prior to administering the first dose of Soliris, unless the risks of delaying Soliris therapy outweigh the risk of developing a meningococcal infection. (See Serious Meningococcal Infections for additional guidance on the management of the risk of meningococcal infection)
  • Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections. Monitor patients for early signs of meningococcal infections and evaluate immediately if infection is suspected.

Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS). Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program. Enrollment in the Soliris REMS program and additional information are available by telephone: 1-888-SOLIRIS (1-888-765-4747) or at www.solirisrems.com.

Contraindications

Soliris is contraindicated in:

  • Patients with unresolved serious Neisseria meningitidis infection
  • Patients who are not currently vaccinated against Neisseria meningitidis, unless the risks of delaying Soliris treatment outweigh the risks of developing a meningococcal infection

Warnings and Precautions

Serious Meningococcal Infections

Risk and Prevention

See Boxed WARNING for additional information on serious meningococcal infections.

Life-threatening and fatal meningococcal infections have occurred in patients treated with Soliris. The use of Soliris increases a patient’s susceptibility to serious meningococcal infections (septicemia and/or meningitis).

Vaccinate for meningococcal disease according to the most current ACIP recommendations for patients with complement deficiencies. Revaccinate patients in accordance with ACIP recommendations, considering the duration of Soliris therapy.

Immunize patients without a history of meningococcal vaccination at least 2 weeks prior to receiving the first dose of Soliris. If urgent Soliris therapy is indicated in an unvaccinated patient, administer meningococcal vaccine(s) as soon as possible and provide patients with two weeks of antibacterial drug prophylaxis.

The benefits and risks of antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of meningococcal infections in patients receiving Soliris have not been established.
Vaccination reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of meningococcal infections.

Closely monitor patients for early signs and symptoms of meningococcal infection and evaluate patients immediately if an infection is suspected. Meningococcal infection may become rapidly life-threatening or fatal if not recognized and treated early. Discontinue Soliris in patients who are undergoing treatment for serious meningococcal infections.

REMS
Because of the risk of meningococcal infections, Soliris is available only through a restricted program under a REMS. Under the Soliris REMS, prescribers must enroll in the program.

Prescribers must counsel patients about the risk of meningococcal infection, provide the patients with the REMS educational materials, and ensure patients are vaccinated with meningococcal vaccine(s).

Other Infections
Serious infections with Neisseria species (other than N. meningitidis), including disseminated gonococcal infections, have been reported.

Soliris blocks terminal complement activation; therefore patients may have increased susceptibility to infections, especially with encapsulated bacteria. Additionally, Aspergillus infections have occurred in immunocompromised and neutropenic patients. Children treated with Soliris may be at increased risk of developing serious infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Administer vaccinations for the prevention of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) infections according to ACIP guidelines. Use caution when administering Soliris to patients with any systemic infection.

Monitoring Disease Manifestations After Soliris Discontinuation

Treatment Discontinuation for PNH
Monitor patients after discontinuing Soliris for at least 8 weeks to detect hemolysis.

Thrombosis Prevention and Management
The effect of withdrawal of anticoagulant therapy during Soliris treatment has not been established. Therefore, treatment with Soliris should not alter anticoagulant management.

Infusion Reactions
Administration of Soliris may result in infusion reactions, including anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. In clinical trials, no patients experienced an infusion reaction which required discontinuation of Soliris. Interrupt Soliris infusion and institute appropriate supportive measures if signs of cardiovascular instability or respiratory compromise occur.

Adverse Reactions
The most frequently reported adverse reactions in the PNH randomized trial (≥10% overall and greater than placebo) are: headache, nasopharyngitis, back pain, and nausea.

Please see full Prescribing Information for Soliris, including boxed WARNING regarding serious meningococcal infections.

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2. Hillmen P, et al. N Engl J Med. 2006;355(12):1233-1243.
3. Hill A, et al. Br J Haematol. 2010;149(3):414-425.
4. Hillmen P, et al. Am J Hematol. 2010;85(8):553-559.
5.
Hillmen P, et al. Br J Haematol. 2013;162(1):62-73.
6.Soliris® (eculizumab) [Prescribing Information]. Boston, MA: Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 2018.
7. Brodsky RA. Blood. 2009;113;6522-6527.
8. Parker C, et al. Blood. 2005;106:3699-3709.
9. Hillmen P, et al. N Engl J Med. 1995;333(19):1253-1258.
10. Brodsky RA. Blood Rev. 2008;22(2):65-74.
11. Hillmen P, et al. Blood. 2007;110(12):4123-4128.
12. Rosse WF. In: Hoffman R, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 3rd ed. New York, NY; Churchill Livingstone; 2000:331-342.
13. Rother RP, et al. JAMA. 2005;293(13):1653-1662.
14. Hill A, et al. Br J Haematol. 2007;137:181-192.
15. Kelly R, et al. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2009;5:911-921.
16. Kelly RJ, et al. Blood. 2011;117(25):6786-6792.